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Naderev Saño, the Philippines’ lead negotiator, gives a brilliant, emotional 3 minute speech at the U.N. Climate Change Conference in Doha, on 6 November 2012. It is enormously difficult to keep your chin up as a negotiator in such a slow and tedious process. But do you always have to keep your chin up? Can’t a show of emotion move people to action and sway decisions?


Originally posted by Adam Mordecai in Upworthy.

The Boston Globe Big Picture features pictures of the typhoon known internationally as Bopha that Saño refers to.

If you know anyone who doubts the reality of anthropogenic climate change, send him or her to listen to the great presentation by Rob Dunbar (TED).

In his talk showing and explaining oceanic evidence of climate change, Dunbar said: “I was in Copenhagen in December (2009), like a number of you in this room. And I think we all found it, simultaneously, an eye-opening and a very frustrating experience. I sat in this large negotiation hall, at one point, for three or four hours, without hearing the word “oceans” one time. It really wasn’t on the radar screen. The nations that brought it up when we had the speeches of the national leaders — it tended to be the leaders of the small island states, the low-lying island states. And by this weird quirk of alphabetical order of the nations, a lot of the low-lying states, like Kiribati and Nauru, they were seated at the very end of these immensely long rows. You know, they were marginalized in the negotiation room.”