Hitting the books again

Having finished Basis for Business C1, and soon to hand over ELTABB events coordination, my workload is relatively light.  Next to my compact teaching sessions I’m writing teaching files:

But overall I now have a little extra time on my hands to finally, finally finish my Diploma TESOL.

I was in Barcelona in August 2011 to complete Unit 1, the written exam, and Unit 3, the assessed lessons and the oral phonology exam. I blogged about that here. I’ve also completed most of Unit 2, including my Observation Instrument – though I need to rewrite the argument thoroughly, since scaffolding means something different to me now.  My Developmental Record on teaching pronunciation is all done.

What remains is my Independent Research Project. It will most probably be either

  • a questionnaire on Learner Inventory – an issue that is much debated and misunderstood, but was a revelation to me in Barcelona. I’m looking forward to welcoming Rebecca Oxford to ELTABB on 1 June.  We had Marjorie Rosenberg speaking here recently on Learning Styles, and her book for Delta Publishing is very useful. I think there is more to both Learner Inventory and Learning Styles than meets the eye. Specifically, I’m interested in how awareness of learner-style diversity can increase skill in handling cross-cultural diversity. This is a minefield I’ve wanted to get a handle on for some time. It’ll require a bit of deep thought.
  • a questionnaire on using technology to extend a coursebook – this is an old chestnut of a topic, but one I’m rather a specialist in. Oxford University Press have very kindly invited me to provide a VHS teacher training workshop on combining the new Headway with online tools, a workshop due on 21 June.

As I work out how to set up those questionnaires and the arguments to go with them, I’ll be rereading Theresa’s and Paul’s related posts on their great (discontinued) blog, http://passthediploma.edublogs.org/

Bella ciao, blogroll

I’ve deleted my old blogroll, which hailed from the heyday of teachers blogging (about 2009-2011). More than half of the blogs linked to were no longer being updated, and many new ones have emerged over the past year or two, some of whom have also in part given up in the meantime. I’ve found it very time consuming to manipulate my back end to delete and add individual blogs. So: Blogroll, bella ciao!

Tag: 11 facts, questions, answers among ELT bloggers

I’ve been  tagged in a Twitter-cum-teacher-blog game, and am happy to play by the rules:

  1. Acknowledge the nominating blogger.
  2. Share 11 random facts about yourself.
  3.  Answer the 11 questions the nominating blogger has created for you.
  4.  List 11 bloggers.
  5. Post 11 questions for the bloggers you nominate to answer, and let all the bloggers know they have been nominated. Don’t nominate a blogger who has nominated you.

1. Thank you, dear  Eva Buyuksimkesyan (on Twitter: ‏@evab2001) and Janet Bianchini (Twitter ‏@janetbianchini for tagging me. Season’s greetings to you ladies! May your fondest wishes for 2014 come true. Continue reading Tag: 11 facts, questions, answers among ELT bloggers

Testing, scheduling, resuming

Testing.
I hope to resume proper blogging when this book project is done.
I’ve learned so much, including to love scheduling time. I think the way forward is to go back to the format I had at the beginning, which was to write once a week. That is valuable in that it allows a more essay-like approach than the notebook-approach I’ve been employing over the past year or so. Proper essay writing is far more intensive, and therefore more worthwhile online. I do teach business English, after all, but you wouldn’t know it to look at this blog lately. So back to the drawing board.

Is privacy the new taboo?

I’ve been online now for just over 5 years. Recently I accidentally found the first video I made of myself, where I self-consciously wondered whether the information broadcasting movement I was about to join had any relevance, or whether it was a half-witted attempt to engage in broader but seemingly disconnected discourses, as half-witted as the information selected for the Voyager time capsule meant for both future generations and extraterrestrials, now spinning around in outer space.

No, I am not going to share it. Too much information.

My blog is again disconnected. I’ve effectively shut down the communication overload that was making me spend more time than I could afford or than was good for me on the internet. Other bloggers are doing similar things it seems, as many networks with their own channels have formed. Facebook is the new general watering hole, and that too will need reducing. Facebook is scary. And that’s me saying it, someone who has shared domestic scenes and childhood memories on her professional blog. It’s the interconnectedness of everything that is so disturbing. It costs the wrong kind of time to keep up, and makes finding things so easy for the wrong kind of people.

I just watched the film on the Anonymous movement and am really somewhat taken aback by the extreme change in attitude that seems to have developed not only among hackers, but among many young people in general that the public has the right to know pretty much anything at any time, certainly about people with any kind of social or economic or political power. It used to be that you had to understand history to understand the now in perspective. I studied history for that reason. Today, history is history. Recently, the loud and pervasive advice to normal people who venture online is: forget privacy, you’ve long lost it. So it seems the only protection against privacy invasion is not to be interesting.

For everyone else, privacy is the new taboo.

Links about Anonymous:

Compare and contrast

Anne at Lago di LedroSteiff bear in Giengen

Thanks Helmut.

There’s a personal story that goes with this, as you can well imagine. My first present from my husband was a…

Blog challenge! Please join in and add two similar but different pictures to your blog!
Brad Patterson
had the nice idea after I’d posted this.
Looking forward to seeing your pictures.
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