Jill Tarter: A young science in an old universe

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Writing something on astronomy for Spotlight (dort Englischlernen). Ever since, as a child, I sat gazing at the August night sky on Drummond Island with those “10 to the 22” (=10 hoch 22) stars above me, I’ve always loved them. Isn’t it marvellous to think that what you see up there is history, fossilized astronomy, that what you see is sparkling at you from the past? I thoroughly enjoyed this talk by Jill Tarter (thank you, twittering thebirdsword !)

It’s the 400th anniversary of of Gallileo’s first use of the telescope, and the 50th year of SETI – the search for extraterrestrial intelligence – as a science. And the Kepler Mission, seeking planets similar to Earth, is due to launch on 6 March.

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